Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Captain of Costa Concordia back on board

27 February 2014, 18:28

Giglio Island - The disgraced former captain of a luxury cruise liner that capsized off an Italian island went back on board on Thursday for the first time since the 2012 shipwreck that killed 32 people.

The last time Francesco Schettino was on the Costa Concordia he was about to board a lifeboat while hundreds of passengers and crew were still trying to figure out their own escape routes after the liner rammed a reef close to Giglio Island on 13 January 2012, rapidly took on water and listed badly.

Schettino is on trial on charges of manslaughter, causing the shipwreck by steering too close to the island, and then abandoning ship before everyone else had been safely evacuated. He was allowed to board the ship to help court-appointed experts inspect generators.

The hulk was set upright in a daring engineering feat last year.

Many who perished drowned either after they jumped into the sea after lifeboats could no longer be launched because of the ship's tilt, or were caught in the rush of seawater that swamped elevator shafts and much of the rest of the Concordia.

Schettino, the sole defendant, claims that faulty emergency generators and a poorly trained crew contributed to tragedy. The inspection was requested by the defence and lawyers for consumer groups, which also contend that Costa Crociere Spa, the cruise company, shares some blame.

"I gave indications that will help the experts decide how to divvy up the responsibility" for the tragedy, Schettino told reporters after the inspection.

Prosecutors disagree. "None of the 32 Costa Concordia died because the emergency diesel generators didn't work the night of the shipwreck," Chief Prosecutor Francesco Verusio was quoted by the Italian news agency ANSA as saying in Grosseto, the Tuscan town where the trial is being held.

Five other Costa Crociere employees who were indicted in the case were allowed to enter plea bargains and none is serving prison time.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...