Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Court tells France to keep paraplegic on life-support

25 June 2014, 11:55

Strasbourg - The European Court of Human Rights has told France not to remove life support from a man in a vegetative state for the past six years, blocking a landmark French court ruling.

France's highest administrative court earlier on Tuesday gave the green light to end the life of Vincent Lambert, who has been a quadriplegic with severe brain damage since a road accident in 2008, in a decision that went against his parents' wishes.

The case has torn his family apart at a time of intense debate in France over euthanasia and the high-profile trial of a doctor accused of poisoning seven terminally ill patients.

Doctors treating 38-year-old Lambert in the northeastern city of Reims, as well as his wife, nephew and six of his eight siblings want to cut off intravenous food and water supplies.

But his deeply religious Catholic parents, one brother and one sister oppose the decision and took the case to the European Court of Human Rights.

Lambert's parents said they were "infinitely relieved" at the European court's decision.

"Viviane, Vincent's mother, was in tears at the death sentence handed down by the State Council. Her tears were dried by the European court," one of their lawyers, Jerrome Triomphe, told AFP.

'Vincent is suffering'

However Dr Eric Karliger, who heads the palliative care service at the Reims hospital where Lambert is being treated, said the latest ruling "prolongs Vincent's plight".

The European ruling will force the hospital to continue to provide the patient with treatment he doesn't want, he added.

Francois Lambert, Vincent's nephew, also regretted the decision.

" I hope that the case will move quickly because Vincent's suffering is constant and growing, "he told AFP.

In a letter to the French government seen by AFP, the Strasbourg-based court told Paris to "suspend the execution of this judgement for the duration of the proceedings before the Court."

"This means that Vincent Lambert should not be moved with the intention of stopping his nourishment or hydration," said the letter, given to AFP by the lawyer representing Lambert's parents, Jean Paillot.

France's State Council ruled that ending life support for Lambert was in line with a 2005 law that allowed passive euthanasia - the act of withholding or withdrawing treatment that is necessary to maintain life.

"This decision is without any doubt the most difficult the State Council has had to take in the last 50 years," said the deputy head of the court, Jean-Marc Sauve.

The court said the decision to end treatment was in line with the wishes of Lambert, a former psychiatric nurse, that he did not want to be kept alive artificially.

"Vincent's wish not to continue living this way has been heard," his wife Rachel told AFP after the French court's ruling. "This is an important and decisive step in my fight for respecting my husband.

'No hope of recovery'

When doctors first decided to cut life support, Lambert's parents took the case to a court near Reims, which ruled against ending his life earlier this year, prompting the case to be brought to the State Council on appeal.

The State Council's decision mirrors conclusions reached last week by the court's public rapporteur Remi Keller, a magistrate responsible for examining the case.

He recommended ending Lambert's life, saying there was no hope of recovery.

Jean Leonetti, a doctor and lawmaker who drafted the law that legalised passive euthanasia, welcomed the State Council's decision.

"This decision is not the validation of an act of euthanasia, but rather the refusal of prolonging life by relentless treatment," he said in a statement.

But he warned that the decision could not be "generalised" to all those in similar situations, as "each situation must be assessed on a case-by-case basis."

The trial of mercy-killing doctor Nicolas Bonnemaison is meanwhile due to close this week.

On Tuesday prosecutors called for a five-year - potentially suspended - prison sentence for the emergency room doctor.

They acknowledged that his intentions were good but said he had nonetheless broken the law.

Bonnemaison has defended his acts on the grounds that the patients he poisoned were suffering terribly.


Tags france

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...