Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa

31 July 2015, 19:40

London - An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.

There is currently no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola, which has so far killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa since the world's biggest outbreak began in the forest region of Guinea last year.

Also read: 70 000 Liberian births unrecorded in Ebola crisis - Unicef

"If proven effective, this is going to be a game-changer," said Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization, which sponsored the study. "It will change the management of the current outbreak and future outbreaks."

Scientists have struggled for years to develop Ebola treatments and vaccines but have faced numerous hurdles, including the sporadic nature of outbreaks. Many past attempts have failed, including a recently abandoned drug cocktail being tested in West Africa by Tekmira Pharmaceuticals.

Researchers gave one dose of the new vaccine, developed by the Canadian government, to more than 4,000 people who were contacts of confirmed Ebola cases within 10 days of being identified. In comparison, more than 3,500 contacts of other Ebola cases got the shot after a 10-day delay. In the group that received the vaccine immediately, there were no Ebola cases versus 16 cases in people who got delayed vaccination. The vaccine has since been licensed to Merck. The study was published online Friday in the journal Lancet.

An expert group monitoring the study's data and safety recommended the trial be stopped on July 26 so that everyone exposed to Ebola in Guinea could get immunized.

The vaccine uses an Ebola protein to prompt the body's immune system to attack the virus.

"It looks to be about as safe as a flu vaccine," said Ben Neuman, a virologist at the University of Reading who was not part of the trial. Researchers are still assessing possible side effects; the most serious seemed to be fever and the stress experienced by patients who believe such symptoms were due to Ebola.

"This (vaccine) could be the key that we've been missing to end the outbreak," Neuman said. "I don't see any reason on humanitarian grounds why it should not be used immediately." He said further tests would be necessary to see if the vaccine might also protect pregnant women, children and adolescents; those trials are already under way.

WHO vaccines expert Marie-Paule Kieny said having an effective immunization might avert future disasters but added it would still take months to get the shot licensed.

"Using a tool like this vaccine, we would be able to stop the epidemic from going really wild and spreading further," she told reporters, noting that stamping out future outbreaks still depends on early detection. WHO first identified Ebola in Guinea last March but did not declare the epidemic to be a global emergency until August, when the virus had killed nearly 1,000 people.

Other Ebola vaccines are being studied elsewhere but the declining caseload, there were just seven new patients reported in West Africa last week, is complicating efforts to finish the trials.

Dr. Bertrand Draguez of Doctors Without Borders, which helped test the vaccine in its treatment clinics in Guinea, said the immunization should immediately be made available.

"With such high efficacy, all affected countries should immediately expand vaccination of contacts of infected patients in order to break chains of transmission and vaccinate all front-line workers to protect them," he said in a statement.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...