Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Global organised crime 'G20 economy' sized

30 July 2013, 09:59

Sydney - Organised crime is so big globally that were it a country, it would be part of the G20 group of major economies, the Australian government said on Tuesday.

Releasing the Australian Crime Commission's biennial report on the issue, Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said organised crime had boomed and grown more complex with the advent of the Internet.

"Organised crime worldwide makes more than $870bn every year. That's bigger than the GDP of Indonesia," said Clare.

"If organised crime was a country it would be in the G20," he added.

In Australia, Clare said the problem wiped $13.7bn from the economy every year, with thriving online marketplaces for guns, drugs, identity documents and child pornography.

Growing concerns

The figure is roughly equivalent to the value of Australia's international student sector to the economy

"Users of illicit drugs no longer have to seek out dealers on the street. They can order the drug of their choice on the net and have it delivered to their door," Clare said.

"This is a real threat that has the potential to grow exponentially."

According to the ACC report, online fraud scams, credit card and account data theft and suburban drug labs were some of the major examples of organised crime in Australia, along with public violence between rival groups.

The ACC said the health system was also been burdened by illicit drug users and money laundering was bankrupting bona fide small businesses.

"Hacktivism", where politically or issues-motivated groups infiltrated official networks to make a "moral or political point", was also a growing concern, the report said.

The impacts of organised crime were such that the ACC said it was now one of the top seven national security risks facing Australia.

A UN report published in April estimated the cost of transnational organised crime in East Asia and the Pacific at $90bn, with counterfeit goods, illegal wood products, heroin and methamphetamines the top money-spinners.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...