Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Indian killer road creates village of widows

12 October 2015, 10:15

Peddakunta - For developing India, dangerous and potholed roads have long been a way of life.

But one highway running through a village in the southern state of Telangana has gained a dire reputation, blamed for the deaths of scores trying to cross it.

A bypass road of national highway 44 snakes through Peddakunta village, cutting off the community from its headquarters on the other side.

Since the road was built in 2006, Peddakunta has been dubbed the "village of highway widows" with only one male adult left among the huts of 35 families. The rest of the village comprises women, children and the elderly.

Some 25 male residents have been killed in Peddakunta trying to reach the other side, locals say.

"My husband died in a bypass road accident and so did my brother and my father. There are no men to look after us in the family," Kurra Asli, 23, told AFP, holding up a faded photograph of her husband.

Another widow held up a black and white printout of her dead husband, his body laying on the bypass, his left foot crushed.

Also read: Mob kills Indian man over beef rumours: police

Locals have demanded a foot bridge or tunnel so they can safely cross the four-lane stretch to reach the headquarters to collect monthly pensions or find employment in other villages.

But widows say their demands have been ignored.

"No one will help us. Everyone will come, take photos and videos and go off," said K. Maani, 38, as she cooked over a stove made of mud.

"I do not have a gas stove or even a bathroom, no one is there to help us," said the mother of three.

India has some of the world's deadliest roads with more than 230,000 fatalities annually, according to the World Health Organization.

Transport analysts attribute the huge number of accidents to poor roads, ill-trained drivers and reckless driving.

The national government has put forward proposals for new legislation to make roads safer by stiffening lax traffic regulations.


Tags india

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...