Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Israeli buzz on Iran aims to pressure US

20 August 2012, 15:24

Jerusalem - A high-volume public debate in Israel over a possible imminent military strike on Iran's nuclear facilities is designed to pressure Washington to back its ally more firmly, experts say.

Media chatter over Israel's intentions has become a cacophony, fed daily by pronouncements from politicians, retired generals, former security officials and various commentators.

They fill newspaper columns and radio and TV broadcasts with their opinions for or against a pre-emptive Israeli operation against Iran, with or without US approval or assistance.

Such talk has been further fuelled by the mass distribution of gas masks to the public, by tests of an SMS attack warning system and by speculation about possible Israeli casualty numbers in the event of an Iranian counter-attack.

Defence Minister Ehud Barak and other senior officials have estimated a conflict could last 30 days and claim 500 Israeli lives.

"There is an orchestrated hysteria, deliberately timed, to put the country in a state of anxiety, artificial or not," former military intelligence chief Uri Saguy wrote this weekend in the left-leaning Haaretz newspaper.

Last resort

Apart from preparing public opinion for the consequences of a conflict, the surge in public statements aims to push US President Barack Obama to take a more hawkish stance on Iran, said Denis Charbit, professor of political science at Israel's Open University.

"The use of this public diplomacy on the part of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his defence minister aims to obtain a clearer commitment by the United States to attack if Iran continues its nuclear programme, or at least to give Israel the green light to do so," he said.

Obama has said Washington will stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, but has spoken of military action as a last resort that should be preceded by diplomacy and economic sanctions. Netanyahu on the other hand has aggressively pushed the idea of a pre-emptive strike.

There is concern in Washington that a unilateral Israeli strike may not destroy Iran's underground nuclear facilities and could spark Iranian retaliation worldwide, dragging the United States into another war in the Middle East.

"Statements from the White House are considered too vague by Israeli leaders," Charbit said. "By publicly raising the possibility of an imminent Israeli military operation, they want to push the Americans into showing their hand."

The Israeli wish for a firmer US commitment was expressed by another former head of military intelligence, Amos Yadlin, in an opinion piece published at the weekend in the Washington Post.

Counter-productive strategy

"The US president should visit Israel and tell its leadership - and, more important, its people - that preventing a nuclear Iran is a US interest, and if we have to resort to military action, we will," he wrote, suggesting that Obama address Israel's parliament.

"This message, delivered by the president of the United States to the Israeli Knesset, would be far more effective than US officials' attempts to convey the same sentiment behind closed doors," said Yadlin, who is in regular contact with Netanyahu and senior Israeli defence and security officials.

But Eytan Gilboa, an expert on US-Israel relations at Bar-Ilan University near Tel Aviv, warned that the Israeli strategy of putting pressure on the White House could be counter-productive, especially with Obama up for re-election in November.

"The period before the presidential election in the United States is inopportune," he said.

"The series of leaks and declarations in the Israeli media has a negative impact by exposing a high level of mutual mistrust and a lack of co-ordination between Israel and the United States."

Gilboa was however cautiously optimistic about a possible Netanyahu-Obama meeting on the sidelines of next month's UN General Assembly in New York, although Netanyahu's office has so far not confirmed he will attend.

"The meeting might provide a good opportunity to restore trust and understanding between the two leaders regarding the policy towards Iran," he said.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...