Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Miranda sues over Snowden-linked detention

21 August 2013, 10:14

London - The partner of the US journalist behind the Edward Snowden leaks launched legal action against Britain on Tuesday for holding him under anti-terror laws as the government admitted it was kept informed about his detention.

David Miranda, a Brazilian national who has been working with his partner Glenn Greenwald on the US intelligence leaks, was held and questioned for almost nine hours at London Heathrow Airport.

The Guardian meanwhile said the British government had forced it to destroy files or face a court battle over its publication of US security secrets leaked by Snowden, who has been granted temporary asylum in Russia.

"David Miranda is taking a civil action over his material and the way that he was treated," Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger, whose newspaper has worked with Greenwald and Snowden, told the BBC.

British police confiscated Miranda's mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles, according to The Guardian.

"He wants that material back and he doesn't want it copied," Rusbridger said.

Cameron denies involvement

The detention of Miranda, aged 28, has caused an international outcry and sparked protests from Brazil. He was travelling home to Rio de Janeiro from Berlin at the time and was held in a Heathrow transit lounge.

The British government has faced questions about its involvement after the White House said it had received a "heads up" that police were about to arrest Miranda.

Britain's interior minister, Home Secretary Theresa May, revealed she was briefed in advance of Miranda's detention, but said it was not for her to tell the police whom they should or should not stop at airports.

May said: "If it is believed that somebody has in their possession highly sensitive stolen information which could help terrorists, which could lead to a loss of lives, then it is right that the police act and that is what the law enables them to do".

Prime Minister David Cameron's office also denied any political involvement.

"The detention was an operational matter for the police. Number 10 was kept informed in the usual way," a Downing Street source told AFP on condition of anonymity.

Greenwald told CNN he had no evidence that the US ordered the detention, but that he was "disturbed my government was aware of this foreign country's intent to detain my foreign partner and did nothing to discourage it".

But he dismissed as "completely inaccurate" a quote attributed to him vowing to target the British government as revenge for the detention.

In the same joint interview, Miranda spoke of his "relief" after finally arriving in Brazil.

"I knew I would be protected here because I was in my country," he explained.

Destruction of material

The legal firm acting for Miranda, Bindmans, said it was challenging the legality of the detention under Schedule 7 of Britain's Terrorism Act 2000, which applies to ports and airports, after being contacted on Sunday.

Bindmans said it had written to the Home Office saying it would go to court this week if it did not receive assurances that "there will be no inspection, copying, disclosure, transfer, distribution or interference, in any way, with our client's data pending determination of our client's claim".

The wider questions of state secrecy and the law intensified when Rusbridger made his claim about being ordered to destroy some of the Guardian's Snowden files.

Writing in Tuesday's edition of the paper, Rusbridger said that two months ago he had been contacted by "a very senior government official claiming to represent the views of the prime minister".

The Daily Mail and Independent newspaper both reported on Wednesday that the official was Jeremy Heywood, Britain's top civil servant.

The call led to two meetings in which "he demanded the return or destruction of all the material we were working on".

At the time, The Guardian was publishing a series of candid revelations about mass surveillance programmes conducted by the US National Security Agency and its British counterpart, GCHQ, after former NSA contractor Snowden handed them thousands of documents.

He said two GCHQ security experts oversaw "the destruction of hard drives in The Guardian's basement".

Rusbridger did not explain why he had waited a month to reveal the destruction of the computer equipment.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...