Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Mississippi marks 1963 civil rights sit-in

29 May 2013, 09:48

Jackson — Mississippi on Tuesday unveiled a historical marker commemorating the sit-in exactly 50 years earlier at a whites-only lunch counter in downtown Jackson, a pivotal event in breaking down state-sanctioned segregation.

The Woolworth's store has been gone for decades, and the site is now a grassy space between a parking garage and a high-rise office building. However, social changes prompted by the civil rights movement are very much in evidence in a state with a large number of black elected officials.

A racially mixed group, led by students and faculty members from historically black Tougaloo College in north Jackson, participated in the sit-in on 28 May 1963. The group was attacked by an angry white mob, including teenagers from nearby Central High School. Some of the peaceful civil rights protesters were beaten, while others were doused with ketchup, mustard and sugar. Jackson police stood by and made few arrests while the riot dragged on for hours.

"Although they took their lives in their hands, they changed Mississippi and they changed America," former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Reuben V Anderson told more than 150 people at the dedication ceremony.

The historical marker is off Capitol Street, two blocks west of the Governor's Mansion. It's the 12th entry on the Mississippi Freedom Trail, a series of signs the state started putting up in 2011 to remember people and events of the civil rights movement.

The sit-in at the Jackson five-and-dime was similar to others across the South, though Jackson's occurred more than three years after a more famous one in Greensboro, North Carolina.


The Reverend Ed King, a Methodist minister who was Tougaloo's chaplain at the time, stood in Woolworth's as an observer, and made phone calls to provide updates to Medgar Evers, Mississippi leader of the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, a civil rights group.

Evers worked at the NAACP office the day of the protest, to stay in touch with the outside world about what was happening.

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, of Alexandria, Virginia, a Tougaloo student who took part in the sit-in, said on Tuesday that the reporters and photographers who covered the protest "were in as much danger as those of us at the counter" because the crowd took out some of its anger on the journalists.

Two weeks after the sit-in, on 12 June 1963, Evers was assassinated outside his family's home in north Jackson.

"Above all, remember Medgar," Trumpauer Mulholland said.

The Woolworth's sit-in was part of a months-long boycott that the NAACP led against white-owned businesses in downtown Jackson.

Starting in late 1962 and extending weeks beyond the sit-in, the boycott had several goals: The hiring of black police officers in Jackson; the elimination of segregated water fountains and lunch counters; the use of courtesy titles for black adults, who routinely were called by their first names rather than "Mr" or "Mrs"; the hiring of black clerks at Capitol Street stores; and the change to a first-come, first-served approach for waiting on customers at downtown stores rather than making black customers wait until whites had been helped.

"Today, that doesn't seem like a lot. But, 50 years ago that was a huge deal," said Anderson, who was a Tougaloo junior in May 1963 but did not participate in the Woolworth's action.

- AP

Tags us racism

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...