Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Musharraf misses court over security fears

06 August 2013, 11:30

Rawalpindi - Pakistan's ex-military ruler Pervez Musharraf on Tuesday failed to appear in court to be indicted over the murder of former premier Benazir Bhutto due to what police said were security concerns.

Musharraf, who ruled the nuclear-armed state from 1999-2008, had been summoned to face charges of criminal conspiracy and the murder of Bhutto in December 2007.

But police and his lawyer told the court in Rawalpindi, the city where Bhutto was assassinated, that it was not safe enough to bring Musharraf to the court due to threats against his life.

Judge Chaudhry Habibur Rehman adjourned the indictment until 20 August and ordered Musharraf to appear then.

Charging a former army chief would be an unprecedented move in a country ruled for more than half of its life by the military.

There is, however, lingering speculation about the possibility of a behind-the-scenes deal that could allow him to leave Pakistan without facing the courts and undermining the military.

Pat downs

Musharraf, who has been under house arrest at his plush villa on the edge of the capital Islamabad since 19 April, had appeared before the court in person on 30 July.

Musharraf's lawyer Syeda Afshan Adil told the court that security threats meant her client could not appear in person.

A police official also confirmed that officers were unable to escort Musharraf to the court house due to security risks.

An AFP reporter said there was tight security at the court with police commandos checking vehicles and patting down pedestrians.

Bhutto, twice elected prime minister of Pakistan, was assassinated in a gun and bomb attack in December 2007 after campaigning in the garrison city of Rawalpindi.

There was no public claim of responsibility for Bhutto's murder.

Series of court battles

Musharraf's government blamed her assassination on Pakistani Taliban chief Baitullah Mehsud, who denied any involvement. He was killed in a US drone attack in 2009.

The Bhutto case is one in a series of court battles that Musharraf has faced over allegations dating back to his 1999-2008 rule, since he returned in March from four years of self-imposed exile.

The new government headed by Nawaz Sharif, whom Musharraf deposed in a coup in 1999, has said he should stand trial for treason and has appointed a committee to investigate the charges against him.

The offence carries the death penalty or life imprisonment.

He is also wanted over the death of Baluchistan rebel leader Nawab Akbar Bugti during a military operation in 2006.

Amnesty International released a statement, intended to coincide with Tuesday's indictment, demanding that Pakistan hold Musharraf accountable for all rights violations committed during his rule.

Wide range of rights violations

"It is encouraging to see the courts take the unprecedented step of bringing a former army chief to account," said Polly Truscott, Amnesty International's deputy Asia Pacific director.

"But Musharraf must be held accountable for all violations committed under his rule, not just a select few," she added.

The London-based rights group says it has documented a wide range of rights violations committed under Musharraf.

"Hundreds, if not thousands, were 'disappeared' during Musharraf's administration, in particular human rights activists documenting violations committed by state security forces and members of armed opposition groups," said Truscott.

Pakistani security forces continue to be implicated in the killing, enforced disappearance and torture of terrorism suspects, political activists and human rights defenders, it said.

"No serving or retired member of Pakistan's security forces is known to have been brought to justice for their alleged involvement in these violations," said Truscott.

Musharraf, aged 69, was arrested after returning from exile to stand in the May elections won by Sharif. He was barred from running for parliament because of the legal allegations against him.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...