Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


No problem with gays, but keep it to yourself Obama, say Kenyans

27 July 2015, 14:48

Nairobi - People in Nairobi on Sunday gave a muted and measured response to US President Barack Obama's firm support for gay rights during his visit to Kenya.

Standing alongside President Uhuru Kenyatta outside State House on Saturday, Obama answered a journalist's question on gay rights by drawing equivalence between homophobia and racism.

"As an African-American in the United States I am painfully aware of what happens when people are treated differently under the law," Obama said.

The comparison is particularly stinging in Kenya, which, like other African countries, has a proud history of resisting and overcoming colonial rule by white foreigners.

"When you start treating people differently, because they're different that's the path whereby freedoms begin to erode, and bad things happen," said Obama, adding that treating people differently "because of who they love is wrong, full stop."

"I've been consistent all across Africa on this," said Obama, who previously spoke in support of gay rights during a visit to Senegal in 2013.

Then, President Macky Sall replied that his country was "not ready" to decriminalise homosexuality, which is illegal in 35 African countries and carries the death penalty in four, according to campaign group Amnesty International.

On Saturday, Kenyatta repeated his argument that, for Kenyans, gay rights is "really a non-issue". He said it was an area of disagreement for Kenya and the US.

Also read: Obama to wade into South Sudan peace drive

"There are some things we don't share, that our society, our culture, don't accept," Kenyatta said.

'Spirit of gayism’

Edna Kendi, a 29-year old software developer was unimpressed by Obama publicly advocating gay rights. "He has to respect our culture," she said. "People can be gay but they should do so in private and quietly."

Kendi urged Obama to "stick to issues that are pertinent to the visit," for her, corruption and trade.

Moses Abok, a 49-year old motorbike taxi driver waiting for customers beneath a shady jacaranda tree, echoed Kenyatta's view.

"To me, it doesn't matter. The spirit of gayism is inside just a few people," he said using a common Kenyan term for homosexuality. "It's not a big deal for us."

But Abok also welcomed Obama's words. "What he said is we should value all people, we shouldn't alienate or eliminate those people, because they are part of us, they are human beings," he said.

Ruo Maina, a 50-year old businessman in the manufacturing industry who had popped out to buy the Sunday papers, said what you do at home is nobody's business.

"As long as you do it in private, we don't care," he said. Maina was not interested in public debates on gay rights, but added that Kenya's vocal anti-gay extremists are equally indulging in unnecessary "provocation".

"We don't need to be saying it is deviant," he said.

Deputy President William Ruto periodically addresses evangelical Christian churches to warn against homosexuality. There is "no room" for gays in Kenya he told worshippers in May, and in July railed against the US for allowing "gay relations and other dirty things."

Anti-gay firebrand Irungu Kangata leads a cross-party caucus seeking to have the country's existing anti-homosexuality laws, which include a maximum 14-year sentence to be strictly applied and makes frequent media appearances to explain that "gayism" is a lifestyle choice that can and should be unmade.

Vincent Kadala, an aspiring politician whose Republican Liberty Party has no seats in parliament, threatened to rally 5 000 naked men and women in order to show Obama "the difference between a man and woman".

The promised protest attracted a lot of media attention but was never held.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...