Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Obama, Pakistani PM Sharif vow co-operation

24 October 2013, 12:34

Washington - President Barack Obama and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif have pledged co-operation on the security issues that have strained ties between their nations, but sources of long-standing tensions did briefly bubble to the surface.

Speaking alongside Obama in the Oval Office on Wednesday, Sharif said he raised the issue of American drone strikes during their two-hour meeting, "emphasizing the need for an end to such strikes".

For his part, Obama made no mention of drones, which have stoked widespread resentment in Pakistan where many believe the targeted strikes by the armed unmanned aircraft kill large numbers of civilians.

Despite the Pakistani concerns, the US has shown no indication it is willing to abandon the attacks, even though the number has dropped in the past couple of years. The Pakistani government secretly supported the strikes in the past, and US officials claim some key leaders still do.

The Washington Post, citing top-secret CIA documents and Pakistani diplomatic memos it had obtained, reported that top officials in Pakistan's government have endorsed the programme for years, if secretly, and routinely received classified briefings on strikes and casualty counts.

In a story posted on Wednesday on its website, the Post reported that markings on the documents indicate that many of them were prepared by the CIA's Counterterrorism Centre specifically to be shared with Pakistan's government.

The documents, which detailed at least 65 strikes in Pakistan, are marked "top secret" but cleared for release to Pakistan, the newspaper reported.

Hot-button issues

Wednesday marked the first time Obama and Sharif have met since the Pakistani leader took office in June. And the mere fact that the talks took place was seen as a sign of progress after a particularly sour period in relations between the security partners.

Obama acknowledged that there will always be some tension between the US and Pakistan, but said he and Sharif agreed to build a relationship based on mutual respect.

"It's a challenge. It's not easy," he said. "We committed to working together and making sure that rather than this being a source of tension between our two countries, it can be a source of strength."

Tensions peaked in 2011 following the US raid inside Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden and the accidental killing of two dozen Pakistani troops in an American airstrike along the Afghan border that same year.

But there have been recent signs of progress, with Pakistan reopening supply routes to Afghanistan that is closed in retaliation for the accidental killing of its troops. And ahead of Sharif's visit, the US quietly decided to release more than $1.6bn in military and economic aid to Pakistan that was suspended in 2011.

Washington has warmly welcomed Sharif, who arrived on Sunday for his first visit to the US capital since taking office. He dined with Secretary of State John Kerry and other top US officials and was hosted at a breakfast meeting on Wednesday at Vice President Joe Biden's residence.

Sharif's wife was also the guest of honour at a tea and poetry reception hosted by first lady Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, the vice president's wife.

A military honor guard also lined the driveway leading to the West Wing of the White House as Sharif arrived for his meeting with Obama.

Beyond drones, the other hot-button issues on the agenda for Wednesday's meeting included plans for winding down the US-led war in Afghanistan and the longstanding tensions between India and Pakistan.

India-Pakistan tension

Both leaders agreed on the need for a stable and secure Afghanistan after combat missions formally conclude there at the end of next year.

The US and Afghanistan are negotiating an agreement to keep some American troops in Afghanistan after 2014, but one unresolved issue - which is a deal breaker for the US - is whether American military courts maintain legal jurisdiction over the troops.

US officials have said the White House is looking to keep fewer than 10 000 troops on the ground after 2014 for counterterrorism and training purposes. Some Pakistani officials fear that a full American withdrawal could increase the flow of extremists across its border with Afghanistan.

Pakistan's conflict with India over the disputed region of Kashmir was also a central topic of the talks. Hours before Obama and Sharif met, India accused Pakistani troops of firing guns and mortars at least 50 Indian border posts overnight in Kashmir. Indian troops returned fire, but one Indian guard was killed and six were injured by a shell fired at the Arnia post in the Jammu region, officials said.

Neither leader mentioned Wednesday's incident. But Obama praised Sharif for seeking to end tensions between the two nuclear-armed neighbours.

"Billions of dollars have been spent on an arms race in response to these tensions," Obama said. "Those resources could be much more properly invested in education, social welfare programmes on both sides of the border between India and Pakistan."

Sharif said he was committed to co-operation with India, including on Kashmir.

The Pakistani leader also invited Obama to visit Pakistan, but the US president did not publicly accept the offer. During his first term, Obama had told Pakistani officials that he wanted to visit the country, but those plans were halted by the increased tensions that followed the bin Laden killing.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...