Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Obama meets Syrian opposition leader

14 May 2014, 14:22

Washington - President Barack Obama has met Syrian opposition leader Ahmad Jarba in a show of support for moderate, embattled foes of President Bashar Assad.

Both sides said the meeting was productive and marked an important step in the evolving relationship between the US and the opposition.

It took place however as the Obama administration again voiced concerns that any deadly aid that was provided at the request of rebels in Syria could end up in the hands of extremists.

Obama dropped by a meeting between Jarba, president of the Syrian National Coalition, and his national security advisor Susan Rice.

The White House said Obama and Rice condemned "the Assad regime's deliberate targeting of Syrian civilians through aerial bombardments - including the use of barrel bombs - and the denial of food and humanitarian assistance to civilians located in areas under siege by the regime".

Thanks for aid

Jarba, according to a White House statement, thanked Obama for a total of $287m in US aid to opposition forces and noted the US role as the largest humanitarian donor to Syrian refugees with a total aid grant of $1.7bn.

But there was no mention in the statement of Jarba's previous plea to the administration for anti-aircraft weapons to combat the barrel bombings unleashed by Assad's forces.

US officials privately acknowledged he made the request in talks with Secretary of State John Kerry at the State Department last week, but they refused to be drawn on the response.

Washington is worried that such weapons could eventually end up in the hands of groups hostile to the US or its allies and could even pose a threat to commercial aircraft.

White House spokesperson Jay Carney said earlier that Washington had worked hard to "ensure that the aid that we are providing the opposition is getting into the hands of the moderate opposition and not falling into the wrong hands".

"This is something that has been a concern and an issue, obviously, since the beginning of the conflict there, but it is one that we take very seriously."

Concrete support needed

Officials say the non-lethal assistance that is being provided includes communications equipment, body armour and night-vision goggles - but declined to give a detailed inventory of the aid.

The Syrian National Coalition described the talks as "encouraging and productive" and a milestone on the road to a closer partnership between the Syrian people and the US aimed at ending the suffering in the country and producing a transition to democracy.

A coalition statement also hinted at the need for more robust military help for opposition groups.

"The opposition delegation discussed the need to empower the Syrian people to defend themselves against the war crimes committed by the regime daily and the need for more pressure against Assad to accept a political solution," the statement said.

Jarba's visit came at an inauspicious time for opponents of Assad, after rebels pulled out of the battleground city of Homs and UN and Arab League mediator Lakhdar Brahimi resigned after failing to broker a political solution to the war which has claimed 150 000 lives.

Speaking after meeting Kerry last week, Jarba thanked Kerry for Washington's support "for the struggle of the Syrian people, for freedom and democracy, and also to lift the injustice and fight oppression and dictatorship that Bashar al-Assad is engaging in".

But he stressed the Syrian people were looking for more concrete support from "the superpower and country that plays a leading role in the world".

Washington has many times warned that Assad has lost legitimacy and must go, but Obama has been wary of embroiling the US in another foreign conflict, after spending years pulling US troops out of Afghanistan and Iraq.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...