Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Obama's unlikely Iran dealmaker

22 July 2015, 06:46

Washington - As negotiators were grasping for a landmark nuclear deal, they hit a roadblock over a once-secret Iranian enrichment site, a fortified bunker buried deep in a mountainside - potentially impervious to US or Israeli air strikes.

The United States wanted the facility at Fordo shuttered, but Iran's supreme leader insisted no nuclear facilities would close. Then, an American nuclear physicist with an untamable mane of wiry grey hair came up with a compromise: Allow the Iranians to tell their hard-liners they were keeping Fordo, but convert it to a research facility whose centrifuges would churn out harmless medical isotopes instead of enriched uranium.

Ernest Moniz, the eccentric MIT professor-turned-US-Energy-secretary, by all accounts played a pivotal role in reaching the historic nuclear accord. Now with his diplomatic legacy on the line, President Barack Obama is turning to Moniz to help sell the deal to a highly sceptical Congress.

Also Read: UN resolution would end Iran sanctions in 10 years

Moniz blitzed morning political talk shows on Sunday, making Obama's case alongside Secretary of State John Kerry. This week, he'll appear before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where doubts about the nuclear pact run high.

In between, aides say, the secretary is squeezing in one-on-one briefings with lawmakers ahead of a likely congressional attempt to scuttle the deal. While juggling his "day job" running the Energy Department, he's also lobbying foreign energy ministers who are similarly suspicious of the deal.

"Secretary Moniz is an everyman scientist," said Senator Chris Murphy, who has received multiple Iran briefings from Moniz. "He can translate those nuclear details in a way that even senators can understand."

Downplaying vulnerabilities

Yet not everyone is content watching nuclear science watered down into talking points. David Albright, a former weapons inspector who runs the Institute for Science and International Security, said Moniz and his colleagues have been downplaying the deal's vulnerabilities, such as that its enrichment restrictions sunset after 10 years, at which point Iran could race for a bomb.

Moniz's role at the centre of the deal began in February after Tehran informed Washington that Ali Akbar Salehi, Iran's atomic energy chief, would be joining the next round of talks. Obama quickly settled on Moniz as a counterpart of Salehi. It turned out the two had something in common: they'd overlapped at MIT, where Moniz taught for decades and Salehi studied nuclear engineering.

The two had never met at MIT, but immediately clicked after meeting on the shores of Lake Geneva, in Switzerland, officials said. A few days later, Moniz and Salehi opted to dine together at a hotel, trading stories about mutual colleagues from MIT. That broke the ice for others on the US and Iranian teams to get acquainted away from the tense negotiating table.

Also Read: Obama takes on opponents of Iran nuclear deal

"He's not one who's very attached to protocol, and he very quickly was joking with the Iranians. The Iranians responded extremely well to that," said Robert Malley, the senior director at the White House's National Security Council and part of the US negotiating team. "Over time, the Iranians learned that behind that appearance was someone who would fight fiercely for what he thought was in our interests."

In Vienna, where negotiators spent much of June and July holed up in a hotel, Moniz developed a reputation as something of a bon vivant, with a quick wit, a chatty demeanour and an exacting palate when it came to his martinis.

He was also the only negotiator to be knighted during the talks.

Moniz, whose grandparents emigrated from Portugal, took a brief jaunt from Vienna to Lisbon to receive the Grand Cross of the Order of Prince Henry, one of Portugal's highest distinctions.

The talks were nearing an end, meaning Moniz would potentially miss the announcement of the deal and ensuing celebration. Although Moniz said he didn't mind skipping it, his colleagues insisted, and he returned to Vienna less than 24 hours after he left.

- AP

Tags iran

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...