Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Opium surged blamed on global demand

01 May 2013, 08:00

Tallinn - Afghanistan, the world's largest grower of opium poppies, should not shoulder all the blame for its drug surge, its foreign minister said on Tuesday while on a visit to Estonia.

"It's not only Afghanistan but the global demand for drugs that should be blamed for illegal narcotics from Afghanistan," Zalmai Rassoul told journalists in Tallinn.

Bringing that demand down "requires an international effort", he added, as Afghanistan struggles to eradicate its rapidly growing poppy industry.

The UN released a report this month warning that the country, one of the world's poorest, is moving towards record levels of opium production this year.

Opium is used to make heroin.

Afghanistan already cultivates about 90% of the global opium supply and now production is expected to rise for a third straight year, expanding even to poppy-free areas.

Rassoul joined Afghan President Hamid Karzai for a two-day visit to Estonia, which has troops stationed in Afghanistan.

Controlling the trade

According to the UN Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Afghanistan had around 154 000ha of poppy fields in 2012.

Last month, Kabul said it planned to destroy 15 000ha this year in its latest efforts to control the heroin trade that fuels endemic violence and corruption.

Poppy farmers are taxed by Taliban militants who use the cash to help fund their insurgency against the government and Nato forces, according to the UNODC.

"Afghanistan is suffering from drugs too," Rassoul said on Tuesday, adding that the number of Afghan drug addicts is on the rise.

Asked why the government was struggling to curb opium cultivation, Rassoul said: "We have been busy fighting on many fronts, fighting terrorists."

"In areas controlled by the government, drug cultivation is falling, but we do not control the whole Afghan territory yet," he added.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...