Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Pakistan youth take up arms

28 February 2013, 13:00

Quetta - Ismatullah holds an AK-47 and checks vehicles on the road. "Enough is enough. We have no trust in the security forces anymore and we'll protect our community ourselves," says the teenage Shi’ite student.

Extremist Sunni Muslim bombers killed nearly 200 people in Pakistan's south-western city of Quetta in the two worst bomb attacks to strike Shi’ite Muslims from the minority Hazara community, just weeks apart on 10 January and 16 February.

After each attack, thousands of Hazaras, including women and children, camped out in the bitter cold demanding that the army step in to protect them. The government brokered an end to the protests, but refused to mobilise the troops.

Outlawed extremist group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claimed responsibility and has threatened to exterminate all Shi’ites. Few believe that dozens of men rounded up after the bomb attacks will ever be brought to justice.

Pakistan's Supreme Court and rights groups accuse the authorities of failing to protect Hazaras and now young men like 18-year-old Ismatullah are taking up arms to defend themselves and their families.

‘Scattered pieces of children...’

Ismatullah's best friend was shot dead last June near Hazara Town. He lost more friends when suicide bombers flattened a snooker hall on 10 January and a massive bomb hidden in a water tanker destroyed a market on 16 February.

"I couldn't control myself when I saw scattered pieces of so many children and women of our community," said the first year college student.

"Our community is only interested in education and business, but terrorists have forced us to take up whatever arms we have and take to the streets for our own security."

At the moment they operate as volunteers under the name, Syed-ul-Shohada Scouts, registered as part of the Baluchistan Scouts Association, an affiliate of the worldwide scouting movement.

For years, young men like Ismatullah have volunteered to protect sensitive events, such as religious processions during the holy month of Muharram.

Permanent deployment of scouts

But their chairperson says the threat is now so great that they should be paid full time as an auxiliary to government security forces.

"We have around 200 young men who perform security duties on specific occasions, but most of them are students and workers, and can't work full-time," said Syed Zaman, chairperson of the Hazara Scouts.

"We are trying to make a system to start their salaries for permanent deployment and also co-ordinate with the security agencies. Hopefully, we will be able to form a regular force... and salaries in a month," he said.

Scouts president Ghulam Haider said it was a mistake to rely on government security when the first of two suicide bombers struck at the snooker hall in the Alamdar Road neighbourhood.

"It resulted in another bomb blast minutes after the first one and we lost many more people," Haider told AFP.

"We didn't want that to happen again, so immediately after the blast on 16 February, we armed our youth to man the streets and entry points, which helped to prevent the chances of a second attack," he claimed.

Police doubts

Hazara Town, where the market was bombed, is very exposed, in the shadow of the Chiltan mountains and near the bypass which links the Afghan border town of Chaman to Pakistan's financial capital Karachi.

While paramilitary Frontier Corps and police patrol the main approaches, they are not visible inside the neighbourhood.

"Security agencies can't protect us. They don't know the area because most of them come from outside Quetta. So we're planning to set up our own permanent posts inside our areas," said Haider.

The police, however, have their doubts.

"If we start private policing by arming one particular community, it will set the wrong precedent," said Fiaz Ahmed Sunbal, head of Quetta police operations.

Long-term solution

He claimed police were planning to close entrances to Hazara Town, and would recruit 200 young Hazaras to patrol their own areas.

Haider says closing off roads will isolate the community but welcomed the recruitment of Hazara Scouts as a long-term solution.

Others warn that time is running out.

"If they don't do anything and something happens again, we will take up guns and go out and kill our opponents. There will be open war," said 26-year-old shopkeeper Zahid Ali.


Tags pakistan

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...