Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Pope Francis: the man who won the world in 5min

10 March 2014, 13:15

Paris - Five minutes. That's all it took to make papal history.

Never has a leader of the Roman Catholic Church become as popular in as short a time as Pope Francis did when he humbly asked the crowd gathered in St Peter's Square on 13 March last year to pray for him.

A year on, Francis, known for his gentle smile and infectious energy, has won over hearts worldwide. Admirers from Manila to Mexico fondly remember his first appearance on the balcony in the Vatican when he began with the simple greeting, "Good evening".

Maria Angelica Largo, a 50-year-old from Colombia, said she "immediately felt he was closer to the people, more simple and more human".

"We have never seen a pope become so popular in just a couple of minutes," said Odon Vallet, a French historian and an expert on religion.

The Argentine-born pope's humble and homespun style - he likes to mingle with the crowds - also bowled over Roger Kouassi, a teacher in the west African country of Ivory Coast for whom the main thing is that "Francis is closer to the people".

On Twitter too, the 77-year-old pontiff has built up a following of millions of people and his messages are re-tweeted more than those of tech-savvy US President Barack Obama.

Francis became the first non-European pope in nearly 1 300 years when he was elected by the College of Cardinals a year ago on Thursday to succeed Benedict XVI, who chose to retire and is now pope emeritus.

Over the past year, Francis has won accolades and plaudits for powerful gestures such as washing the feet of young Muslim inmates, embracing the handicapped and asking that gay people not be judged.

Being Catholic is 'in'

In France, where only 3% of Catholics are identified as practising their religion, priests say there has been an increase in church attendance since Pope Francis's election.

"Before it was 'uncool' to be Catholic, now it's 'in'," said Vallet.

Still the man who was born Jorge Mario Bergoglio has to walk a tight rope in his papacy.

Among his challenges are the thorny issues of marriage for priests and overhauling the Vatican's coffers after a string of scandals, including allegations of waste, corruption and even money-laundering.

And the world's 1.2 billion Catholics are grappling with sensitive and often divisive issues, such as homosexuality and abortion.

In comments that made waves around the world, Francis last July famously asked: "If someone is gay and seeks the Lord with good will, who am I to judge?".

Gay rights groups cautiously welcomed the words as a change in tone, but warned they did not reflect a shift in Catholic Church policy - and certainly not a move towards accepting same-sex marriage.

"If homosexuals want to marry, they can do so in a civil ceremony but we cannot change the Church of Christ to suit one's tastes," said Aurora Gomez, a Catholic in Mexico.

On the other side of the Pacific in the world's fourth largest Catholic country, Filipino Nona Andaya-Castillo said she would back moves to ease Church policies on homosexuality.

But living in one of the few countries where abortion is still illegal, the 52-year-old added she opposed any moves to soften the Church's stance on that issue.

Although no one has expected Francis to make radical changes in doctrine, the pope has shown a willingness to encourage greater understanding and pastoral care of Christians who are divorced, single mothers, or homosexuals.

"The simple humanity of Francis has worked its charm," said Gilda Rey, a Catholic from the southern French city of Toulouse.

"He doesn't hesitate to mingle with the crowds or even celebrate Saint Valentine's Day. He's a very fraternal pope."



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...