Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Public 'overwhelmed' as 9/11 museum opens

22 May 2014, 10:37

New York - New York's 9/11 museum opened to the general public on Wednesday, praised by early visitors as an overwhelming and beautiful tribute to the survivors and nearly 3 000 victims.

The National September 11 Memorial Museum, built into the bedrock of the World Trade Centre Twin Towers, documents the attacks, their impact and legacy with 10 000 artifacts.

It was inaugurated last week at a ceremony attended by President Barack Obama but on Wednesday, ordinary Americans and foreign visitors got their first chance to visit.

Many of the first to emerge said they were reduced to tears by exhibits that include a crushed fire engine, powerful photographs and voice messages of those who were killed.

"I just cried. It makes you very sad when you see that up there in front of you," said Joseph McAuliffe, a 64-year-old senior probation officer from Jersey City.

Like 'going to a funeral'

Damaris Rodriguez, aged 61, who works for the New York state health department and whose daughter Amy is a 9/11 survivor, said she came to find peace.

"I thought it was amazing. It was very overwhelming," she told reporters, saying that the experience had brought the horror of that day rushing back.

Amy, who worked for Lehman Brothers, survived because she was late for work that day.

She also survived the 1993 World Trade Centre bombing and is now a teacher, too traumatised to visit herself.

"It was beautifully done. It was like pulling punches in the stomach," said Shannon Bailey, aged 43, an actor who was in New York on 9/11.

"It made me feel like I was going to a funeral."

But the museum has been no stranger to controversy. Its own religious advisors criticised its depiction of al-Qaeda for being linked too closely to Islam.

Some 9/11 families have also been upset about a lack of dignity in transferring thousands of unidentified remains of victims to an underground repository at the site.

'Stigmatising Arab Americans'

Amateur historian Todd Fine said the museum ignored the neighbourhood's Arab American heritage in the early 20th century and failed to put al-Qaeda into proper context.

By defining the terror network as "Islamist" and describing America's enemies in religious terms, it was fanning the risk of hate crime and stigmatising Arab Americans, he said.

"When I saw that section about Islamism, I became very scared," he told reporters, complaining that the museum should be federally run and leading historians consulted.

But many other visitors told AFP they avoided that section.

"I like that they didn't focus on that because that's not the point," said Gina Doost, a 26-year-old journalist who launched an online magazine.

She said she was most moved by posters of the missing and handwritten notes to loved ones.

"I didn't even want to look at that (al-Qaeda part)," said Rodriguez. "It hurts me to think people could kill in the name of God. It's hard to see - why do they hate us so much?"

Another bone of contention has been the gift shop, opposed by those who believe in principle that there should be no commercialisation of what is a site of mass murder.

Among the items on sale is a $95 silk scarf depicting the Twin Towers and a platter in the shape of the US, dotted with hearts in place of New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, where the hijacked planes struck.

"It would be like going to a cemetery and someone selling replica headstones or daisies just to make a profit," said Rain Dubilewski, a 24-year-old model from Vermont.

A few complained the $24 admission fee was a little steep, but others pointed out that it was in line with other museums in New York and that admission is free on Tuesday evenings.

The museum's president, billionaire and former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, has stressed the venue does not receive federal funding and will cost an estimated $60 million per year. 



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...