Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


'Queen's vagina' sculpture at Versailles vandalised again

07 September 2015, 12:20

Paris - A controversial sculpture by artist Anish Kapoor on display in the gardens of the Palace of Versailles - and informally dubbed the "queen's vagina" - was vandalised again on Sunday, this time by anti-Semitic graffitti, officials said.

The giant sculpture was attacked in June and then cleaned, but Kapoor said that this time the graffitti would remain on the work, to bear witness to hatred.

Officially known as "Dirty Corner," the sculpture comprises a huge steel funnel that the 61-year-old British-Indian artist has described as "very sexual."

It and the rocks around it were sprayed in white paint with phrases such as "SS blood sacrifice," "Queen sacrificed, twice insulted," "the second RAPE of the nation by DEVIANT JEWISH activism" and "Christ is king in Versailles," the palace management said.

President Francois Hollande condemned the vandalism as "hateful and anti-Semitic" and Prime Minister Manuel Valls took to Twitter to say he felt disgust and warn the perpetrators would be severely punished.

Culture Minister Fleur Pellerin said the vandalism was an "attack on freedom of creation" and the phrases were "unacceptable."

"This is no more or less an act which reveals a fascist vision of art," she said in a statement after going to Versailles to inspect the damage.

The steel-and-rock sculpture, which faces the royal chateau, is 60 metres long and 10 metres high.

Shortly after the sculpture was unveiled in June, vandals splattered it with yellow paint.

- 'Abominable words ' -

But Kapoor, after discussing the new attack with France's culture authorities, told the daily Le Figaro he would not restore the work as he did the first time, and instead would keep the "abominable words" as part of the sculpture.

Also read: Australian sheep is officially the world's woolliest

"I had already questioned the wisdom of cleaning it after the first vandalism. This time, I am convinced that nothing should be removed from these slurs, from these words which belong to anti-Semitism that we'd rather forget," Kapoor said in comments Le Figaro published in French.

"From now on, in the name of our universal principles, these abominable words will become part of my work, they will overlay it and stigmatise it."

A source close to the investigation commenting on the inscriptions said the likely suspects were "individuals with ultra-conservative leanings."

"We have some ideas about those who fit the profile," the source added.

For his part, Kapoor said he was struck by the spirit behind the vandalism and its "connection with the terrible situation between Syria and Europe.

"This is what leads to the exclusion of our Syrian brothers and sisters. Shame on France for the act of a hate-filled minority! This is a violent attack against the human spirit and culture."

The sculpture is one of several by Kapoor which are on show in the gardens and inside one room of the palace until November.

Kapoor has previously described the piece as "the vagina of a queen who is taking power" but later appeared to step back from this description.

"The point is to create a dialogue between these great gardens and the sculptures," he said before the display was unveiled.

Kapoor's exhibition is one of the most controversial at Versailles since the authorities opened the palace and its grounds to contemporary artists, hosting works by American artist Jeff Koons in 2008 and by Japanese artist Takashi Murakami in 2010.

Kapoor, who has said he wants sculpture to be about belief, passion or experience rather than form, has become known for his massive public works.

His work is not the first to spark anger in France.

In October 2014, vandals deflated a massive sculpture by American artist Paul McCarthy that was shaped like a sex toy at Paris's Place Vendome.

McCarthy then decided to take down the work, which had both outraged and amused Parisians.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...