Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Recovered Clinton gets back to work

07 January 2013, 08:01

Washington - US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will return to work on Monday after a month-long absence caused by a series of health scares, including a blood clot in her head, the US State Department said.

Clinton has been sidelined for four weeks, since she was taken ill on her return from a trip to Europe on 7 December, and briefly hospitalised for a few days in New York last week.

But the State Department's schedule for the week ahead released late on Sunday revealed the top diplomat will meet on Monday morning with her assistant secretaries in Washington. The talks will be closed to the press.

A series of other meetings is planned through the week, including talks at the White House on Tuesday with Defence Secretary Leon Panetta and National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, which will also most likely not be open to TV cameras.

The high point of the week is set to be on Thursday, when Clinton will host visiting Afghan President Hamid Karzai at the State Department and welcome him for a working dinner.

It has been a rare absence for the normally indefatigable Clinton, who in her four years in office has travelled more than one million kilometres, visited 112 countries and spent close to 400 days in a plane.

Full recovery

Last week, State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland said Clinton was "raring" to get back to work after being treated in a New York hospital for a blood clot discovered in a vein behind her right ear.

The 65-year-old diplomat was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital on 30 December after a scan revealed the clot in the space between her skull and her brain.

Clinton left hospital late on Wednesday after three days of treatment, and headed to her home in Chappaqua, New York, as doctors who prescribed her blood thinners said they expect her to make a full recovery.

"She's looking forward to getting back to the office," Nuland said on Thursday. "She is very much planning to do so next week."

Nuland said there had been an outpouring of support for Clinton from well-wishers around the world. "I think you could call the number of goodwill messages a tsunami," she said.

It is unlikely that Clinton, the most-travelled secretary of state ever, will undertake any more foreign travel in her last weeks in the job.


Her doctors have advised her against any international trips for a while, and Clinton is due to step down towards the end of the month.

President Barack Obama has named veteran Massachusetts senator John Kerry as her successor, and he is set to sail through his confirmation hearings due later this month.

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham told CNN on Sunday that he would back the Democratic Kerry to be the next secretary of state, even though he was against Obama's choice of former Republican senator Chuck Hagel to replace Panetta.

"Senator Kerry has a lot of different views than I do. We're on the opposite ends of the political spectrum, but I respect him. I think he's a thoughtful man. I think he's in the mainstream," Graham said.

Clinton first fell ill with a virulent stomach virus, which caused her to become dehydrated and faint, leading to a concussion. The blood clot is believed to have resulted from her fall.

But her illness was viewed with suspicion by her fiercest rightwing critics, who claimed she had been faking it to avoid testifying about the findings of an inquiry into the 11 September attack on a US mission in Libya.

She has said she still plans to testify before US lawmakers about the results of the probe into the Benghazi attack, but no date has yet been set.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...