Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


S Korea ferry survivors are 'also victims'

23 April 2014, 11:52

Seoul - The desperate, tragically fruitless search for survivors of South Korea's ferry disaster has so far overshadowed the damaging psychological legacy inflicted on those who managed to escape the sinking vessel.

A total of 174 passengers and crew survived the capsize of the 6 825 ton Sewol a week ago, that left around 300 people dead or missing.

Among them were 75 students from Danwon High School, who must now try and rebuild lives shattered by the trauma not just of the incident itself but also the loss of around 250 of their classmates.

Doctors treating the teenage survivors say 20% have exhibited signs of post traumatic stress disorder and could require long-term counselling and psychiatric help.

Jang Dong-Woon, a father speaking on behalf of other parents of the students who survived, told reporters that their children should also be recognised as victims, and not just labelled "lucky" survivors.

"They say they feel like sinners," Jang said, describing an overbearing sense of survivors' guilt among many of the students.

"We should take responsibility for and take care of all of them - those who are still missing, those who are dead and those who have survived," he said.

Some of the children are so traumatised that they even have difficulty being close to windows, fearing "that the water will suddenly rush in", he added.

A total of 352 Danwon High students were on the ferry and the huge loss of life has devastated the city of Ansan, south of Seoul, where the school is located.

Psychological toll

Grief and guilt have already claimed the life of one survivor, the school's deputy principal who hanged himself two days after being rescued from the ship.

He left a suicide note saying it was "so hard to stay alive" when so many students in his care had perished.

"I may become a teacher again in the afterlife for the students whose bodies have yet to be found," the note said.

The disaster - one of the deadliest in South Korea's history - plunged the country into the state of collective mourning, with political campaigns suspended, TV shows and concerts cancelled and tearful vigils held nationwide.

The psychological toll has been especially heavy on the hundreds of relatives of the missing camped out for a week in a gymnasium on the southern island of Jindo.

The gym has become a hothouse of anger and grief with the relatives - mostly parents - riding an emotional roller-coaster as the scramble for survivors turned into a grim search for bodies.

Anger and grief

For those whose loved ones are still unaccounted for, each new day brings another agonising wait for notification that a body has been found that in some way matches their child, brother or sister.

Then comes the harrowing moment when the relatives are taken into tents erected on Jindo harbour to visually identify the body.

"They are in a state of emotional chaos - full of shock, disbelief, anger and grief," said Sohn Jee-Hoon, one of dozens of counsellors working with the families in Jindo - some of them volunteers, some sent by the government.

Many relatives are in need of therapy but are simply too traumatised to consider seeking help, Sohn said, calling the situation "very worrying".

Therapy and counselling in general is frowned upon by many in South Korea who see the need for psychological help as a sign of mental weakness.

At the same time, the country has the highest suicide rate among members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) - and one of the highest in the world - at 33.5 per 100 000 people.

Ha Jung-Mi, a psychiatrist working with the relatives, said there was a real danger that some of them might feel driven to take their own lives.

"Those who are emotionally vulnerable and have no real support system around them are at risk of committing suicide," he said.

Ha also warned of the long-term mental impact of the disaster on the many people involved in the rescue operation, particularly the hundreds of military and civilian divers tasked with recovering the bloated bodies of students and other victims from the sunken ferry.

One amateur diver Lee Jun-Ho has spent hours feeling his way through the ferry's corridors and cabins in near pitch darkness.

"It was horrible to suddenly come almost face to face with a body in the water," said Lee, who has two young children of his own.

"It makes it tough to sleep at night," he said.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...