Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Support grows for New Zealand flag change

31 January 2014, 15:19

Wellington - Queen Elizabeth II's representative in New Zealand has publicly supported debate on ditching the Union Jack from the national flag, saying ties to former colonial ruler Britain have waned.

Commenting on Prime Minister John Key's call for the country to adopt an All Blacks-style silver fern flag, governor-general Sir Jerry Mateparae said modern New Zealanders' national identity was strongly bound to the Pacific.

Mateparae, the former chief of the New Zealand defence force, said he had not yet seen a design he felt reflected the country's identity but he supported debate on changing the flag.

"From the First World War onwards, we have been looking at our identity and we are much more comfortable with our place in the world today as being in the Pacific", he told Wellington's Dominion Post newspaper.

"A hundred years ago there was a greater affiliation to the United Kingdom. We do now see ourselves as deeply seated and rooted in the Pacific."

Key floated the flag change proposal this week but said the government would hold a referendum before any decision was made to alter the existing banner.

The current flag features the Union Jack in one corner, with the remainder consisting of four stars representing the Southern Cross constellation.

Critics say it is an anachronism to have Britain's flag featured so prominently and argue the banner is too easily confused with those of other former British colonies such as Australia, which has an almost identical design.

Others say that New Zealanders have fought and died under the flag, which was first used in 1869 and formally adopted in 1902, arguing that to change it would dishonour their memory.

Key said he believed the flag should display a silver fern on a black background, the national emblem already used by New Zealand sporting teams such as rugby union's All Blacks.

He said Canada, another former colony of Britain, had never regretted adopting its distinctive maple leaf flag in 1965.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...