Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Syrian rebels take key village

05 August 2013, 16:05

Beirut – Syrian rebels battled government troops in the coastal province of Latakia for the second straight day on Monday, making advances in one of President Bashar Assad's strongholds, activists said.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said rebels took control of four villages in mountainous terrain near the Mediterranean Sea.

Like much of Latakia province, they were populated by Alawites, members of the Shi’ite offshoot sect to which Assad's family belongs.

Syria's conflict has taken on an increasingly sectarian tone in the last year, pitting predominantly Sunni Muslim rebels against the Alawite-dominated regime.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said rebels attacked government outposts in the Jabal al-Akrad hills on Sunday.

The group, which relies on reports from activists, said at least 32 government troops and militiamen and at least 19 rebels, including foreign fighters, died in Sunday's fighting.

Much of Latakia has been under the firm control of Assad's forces since the beginning of the conflict more than two years ago, but some areas including the Jabal al-Akrad are close to rebel-held areas and have seen fighting.

It was a rare success for the rebels on the battlefield in recent weeks. Assad's forces have been on the offensive since taking the central town of Qusair in June.

Syria main's opposition bloc hailed the rebel advance, and said the Syrian military had used the captured territory to attack rebel-held civilian areas.

The Observatory's chief Rami Abdul-Rahman said civilians in the four villages fled. There were no immediate reports of civilian casualties in the fighting.

Also on Monday, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said ballistic missiles fired by the Syrian army into populated areas have killed hundreds of civilians in recent months.

The US-based group said it has investigated nine apparent missile attacks that killed at least 215 people, half of them children, between February and July.

The most recent attack HRW investigated occurred in the northern province of Aleppo on 26 July, killing at least 33 civilians including 17 children.

Attacking civilians

HRW activists visited the sites of seven of the nine attacks and found no apparent military targets nearby, the group said.

Ole Solvang, a senior researcher with HRW, said it's impossible to distinguish between civilians and fighters when firing missiles with wide-ranging destructive effects into densely populated areas.

"Even if there are fighters in the area, you cannot accurately target them and the impact in some of these cases has been devastating to local civilians," Solvang said in a statement.

The HRW called on Assad to stop indiscriminate attacks.

Government officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

The military has repeatedly denied it is targeting civilians during the 2-year conflict, saying its troops are fighting "terrorists" hiding in civilian areas.

More than 100 000 people have been killed since the conflict started in March 2011 as largely peaceful protests against Assad's rule.

It turned into an armed uprising after opposition supporters took up arms to fight a brutal government crackdown on dissent.

The Assad government claims it is not facing a popular revolt, but a conspiracy by Gulf Arab states and the West seeking to destroy Syria by supplying Islamic extremists with weapons and funds.

In his latest appearance late on Sunday Assad called on the Syrians to unite behind the army's efforts to "defend their homeland".

"There is no solution with terrorism but to strike with an iron fist," Assad was quoted as saying by state news agency Sana.

"With this kind of battles that aim at the destruction of the cultural identity and the Syrian national fabric, we either win together as Syrians or lose together."

Assad spoke while taking part in an iftar, the meal that breaks the dawn-to-dusk fast during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...