Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Taliban ready to negotiate peace - report

10 September 2012, 13:33

London - Some Taliban figures are ready to negotiate a comprehensive peace deal involving a long-term US military presence in Afghanistan, but will not accept Hamid Karzai's government, the Guardian reported on Monday.

Citing a report to be published by the Royal United Services Institute (Rusi), the British newspaper said the Taliban was determined to make a decisive break with al-Qaeda as part of a settlement and was open to negotiation about education for girls.

"The Taliban would be open to negotiating a ceasefire as part of a general settlement, and also as a bridge between confidence-building measures and the core issue of the distribution of political power in Afghanistan," the Guardian quoted the report as saying.

Rusi said its report, entitled "Taliban Perspectives on Reconciliation", was based on interviews with four unnamed Taliban figures, two of whom were ministers in the former Taliban government and are still close to the inner circle of leadership.

One interviewee, described as a founder member of the Taliban, said the group might accept continuing US counter-terrorist operations targeting al-Qaeda as long as the bases for them were not used as a launching pad for attacks on other countries or for interference in Afghan politics.

The report said that from the Taliban's point of view, any ceasefire would need strong Islamic justification and could not hint at any form of surrender.

The Taliban has long been opposed to negotiating with Karzai's government and does not recognise Afghanistan's constitution approved in 2003.

However, US officials have said that they see signs that insurgent hostility to peace talks may be splintering.

With violence in Afghanistan at its worst levels since US-backed forces ousted the Taliban in 2001, the West is eager to pursue such negotiations, given plans to withdraw most of a currently 100 000-strong Nato-led foreign force by the end of 2014.

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...