Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Torture offered useful, valuable info - CIA chief

12 December 2014, 06:58

Washington - CIA Director John Brennan struck back at a US Senate report that accused the agency of torturing terror detainees, acknowledging that "abhorrent" tactics were used but defending the overall interrogation programme for saving lives after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Brennan conceded that it was "unknown and unknowable" whether the harsh treatment during George W Bush's presidency yielded crucial intelligence that could have been gained in any other way. But he said there is no doubt that detainees subjected to the treatment offered "useful and valuable" information afterward.

Speaking in an unprecedented televised news conference, Brennan was responding to a Senate intelligence committee report that concluded that the CIA inflicted suffering on al-Qaeda prisoners beyond its legal authority.

The report said that none of the agency's "enhanced interrogations" provided crucial information. It cited the CIA's own records, documenting in detail how waterboarding and lesser-known techniques such as "rectal feeding" were actually employed.

Brennan declined to define the techniques as torture, as President Barack Obama and the Senate intelligence committee chairperson have done, refraining from even using the word in his 40 minutes of remarks and answers. Obama banned torture when he took office.

Also Read: Ugandan maid pleads guilty to baby torture

The CIA chief also appeared to draw a distinction between interrogation methods, such as water boarding, that were approved by the Justice Department at the time, and those that were not, including "rectal feeding," death threats and beatings. He did not discuss the techniques by name.

"I certainly agree that there were times when CIA officers exceeded the policy guidance that was given and the authorised techniques that were approved and determined to be lawful," he said. "They went outside of the bounds. ... I will leave to others to how they might want to label those activities. But for me, it was something that is certainly regrettable."

But Brennan defended the overall detention of 119 detainees as having produced valuable intelligence that, among other things, helped the CIA find and kill al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

The 500-page Senate report released on Tuesday exhaustively cites CIA records to dispute that contention. The report points out that the CIA justified the torture — what the report called an extraordinary departure from American practices and values — as necessary to produce unique and otherwise unobtainable intelligence. Those are not terms Brennan used on Thursday to describe the intelligence derived from the programme.

Also Read: Rapist gets invited to dinner then is tortured to death

The report makes clear that agency officials for years told the White House, the Justice Department and Congress that the techniques themselves had elicited crucial information that thwarted dangerous plots.

Yet the report argues that torture failed to produce intelligence that the CIA couldn't have obtained, or didn't already have, elsewhere.

Although the harshest interrogations were carried out in 2002 and 2003, the program continued until December 2007, Brennan acknowledged. All told, 39 detainees were subject to very harsh measures.

Former CIA officials, including George Tenet, who signed off on the interrogations as director, have argued in recent days that the techniques themselves were effective and justified.

Brennan's more nuanced position puts him in harmony with an anti-torture White House while attempting to mollify the many CIA officers involved in the programme who still work for him.

Associated Press writers Ken Dilanian, Calvin Woodward, Nancy Benac and Bradley Klapper contributed to this report.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...