Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


UK court challenge over Indonesia sentence

31 January 2013, 12:30

London - Britain's government faces a High Court challenge on Thursday after it refused to pay for a lawyer for a British grandmother's appeal against her death sentence in Indonesia for drug smuggling.

Lawyers for the charity Reprieve, which works to protect the interests of prisoners worldwide, said it would cost around £2 500 to pay for an adequate lawyer to take on the case.

Lindsay Sandiford, aged 56, was sentenced to death last week for smuggling nearly 5kg of cocaine worth $2.4m on the Indonesian resort island of Bali.

She argued that she had been forced into doing it and faced threats that her children would be harmed, but the authorities say she was the ringleader in a huge international drugs ring.

Law firm Leigh Day is seeking a judicial review of the British government's decision not to pay for a lawyer.

Diplomatic channels

"The government has a duty to ensure that the human rights of British citizens are protected and that those sentenced to death, or suspected of or charged with a crime for which capital punishment may be imposed, have adequate legal assistance at all stages of the proceedings," said Richard Stein, a partner at Leigh Day.

"This judicial review will challenge the government's refusal to fund the £2 500 in expenses it would cost for a qualified Indonesian lawyer to represent Lindsay in her appeal against execution by firing squad which will take place on the beach in Bali if the government do not act."

Britain's Foreign Office said the government does not pay for lawyers abroad representing British nationals, but her case was being raised through diplomatic channels.

"We strongly object to the death penalty and continue to provide consular assistance to Lindsay and her family during this difficult time," said a spokesperson.

The last execution of a foreigner in Indonesia was in June 2008, when two Nigerian drug traffickers were shot.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...