Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


US flies stealth bombers over South Korea

28 March 2013, 15:03

Seoul - The United States said two nuclear-capable B-2 stealth bombers flew "deterrence" missions over South Korea on Thursday, defying apocalyptic threats of retribution from North Korea against ongoing war games.

The deployment of the stealth bombers was clearly meant to deliver a potent message to Pyongyang about the US commitment to defending South Korea against any aggression as military tensions on the Korean peninsula soar.

It came shortly after the North severed its last-remaining military hotline with South Korea and put its rocket units on combat status with a threat to target US bases in the Pacific region.

The two B-2s, from Whiteman Air Force base in Missouri, flew the 20 800km round-trip in a "single continuous mission", dropping dummy ordnance on a target range in the South, the US military said in a statement.

"This ... demonstrates the United States' ability to conduct long-range, precision strikes quickly and at will," the statement said.

The bombers were participating in South Korean-US military exercises that have incensed North Korea, which has threatened to unleash a second Korean War and launch pre-emptive nuclear strikes on South Korea and the US mainland.

US, South in new pact

"The B-2 bomber is an important element of America's enduring and robust extended deterrence capability," the US statement said.

Earlier on Thursday, US Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel told his South Korean counterpart that Seoul could rely on all the military protection the United States has to offer - nuclear, conventional and missile defence.

The US and South Korean militaries signed a new pact last week, providing for a joint military response to even low-level provocation by North Korea.

The use of the stealth bombers is sure to prompt a fresh outcry from Pyongyang, which has already denounced the use of US B-52 bombers in the joint exercises as a rehearsal for a nuclear strike.

While most analysts have dismissed the bulk of the North Korean threats as rhetorical bluster, there are concerns that even a minor incident could swiftly escalate in such a volatile environment.

In its latest protest at the military drills, North Korea announced on Wednesday that it was severing its military hotline with the South, saying it was no longer needed given that "war may break out any moment".

Communication line severed

The joint drills are held every year and are regularly condemned by Pyongyang as rehearsals for invasion.

Their staging this year came as tensions were already riding high following the North's long-range rocket launch in December and its nuclear test last month.

The North has severed the military hotline before, most recently in March 2009, again in protest at the annual South Korean-US military exercises. In that case, the line was reconnected less than two weeks later.

Several weeks ago North Korea severed a Red Cross hotline that had been used for government-to-government communications.

Among other things, the military hotline was used on a daily basis to organise movement in and out of the Kaesong industrial complex - a joint South-North Korean venture established in 2004.

The South Koreans used the line to give the North the names of those seeking entry to Kaesong, guaranteeing their safety as they crossed one of the world's most heavily militarised borders.

The crossing was operating normally on Thursday, officials said, adding that they had had used a civilian link to get the names to the North Korean guards.

North Korea has always been wary of allowing crises in inter-Korean relations to affect the zone, which lies 10km inside its side of the border and is a crucial hard-currency earner for the communist state.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...