Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


US spying 'has reached too far' says Kerry

01 November 2013, 12:38

Washington - US secretary of state John Kerry said on Thursday that US spying has gone too far in some cases, an unprecedented admission by Washington in the row with Europe over widespread surveillance.

The top diplomat also sought to assure that such steps, which have roiled close allies like Germany, would not be repeated.

"I assure you, innocent people are not being abused in this process, but there's an effort to try to gather information," Kerry told a London conference via video link. "And yes, in some cases, it has reached too far inappropriately."

"And the president, our president, is determined to try to clarify and make clear for people, and is now doing a thorough review in order that nobody will have the sense of abuse," he said.

Kerry added that what Washington was trying to do was, in a "random way," find ways of determining if there were threats that needed responding to.

"And in some cases, I acknowledge to you, as has the president, that some of these actions have reached too far, and we are going to make sure that does not happen in the future," he said.

Recent allegations and reports of widespread spying by the US National Security Agency have sparked a major rift in trans-Atlantic ties.


Just days ago, German Chancellor Angela Merkel angrily confronted President Barack Obama with allegations that the NSA was snooping on her phone, saying it would amount to a "breach of trust".

A German intelligence delegation and a separate group of EU lawmakers were in the US capital on Wednesday to confront their American allies about the alleged bugging.

Kerry's remarks (released in a State Department transcript) came in response to a question addressed to both him and British foreign secretary William Hague about government surveillance.

Kerry spent a good portion of his answer justifying the collection of data as necessary due to the threat of terrorism and suggested Washington was not alone in doing so.

"Many, many, many parts of the world have been subject to these terrorist attacks," he said.

"And in response to them, the United States and others came together, others, I emphasise to you and realised that we're dealing in a new world where people are willing to blow themselves up."

He added: "We have actually prevented airplanes from going down, buildings from being blown up, and people from being assassinated because we've been able to learn ahead of time of the plans".

Kerry also lashed out at some of the reporting about alleged spying, sparked by leaks from fugitive former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, wanted by Washington on espionage charges.

False reports

"Just the other day... there was news in the papers of 70 million people being listened to. No, they weren't. It didn't happen," Kerry said.

"There's an enormous amount of exaggeration in this reporting from some reporters out there."

US intelligence chiefs have said these reports are based on a misinterpretation of an NSA slide leaked to the media by Snowden.

Rather than siphoning off the records of tens of millions of calls in Europe, as the slide seems to suggest, they argue that the data was in many cases gathered and shared by European agencies.

Still, fresh US spy allegations keep cropping around the world on a near daily basis.

Indonesia summoned the Australian ambassador in Jakarta on Friday over a "totally unacceptable" report that his embassy was among diplomatic posts in Asia being used in a vast American surveillance operation.

The Sydney Morning Herald newspaper, amplifying an earlier report by the German magazine Der Spiegel, said earlier this week that a top-secret map leaked by Snowden showed 90 US surveillance facilities at diplomatic missions worldwide.

The paper also reported that Australian embassies in Asia were being used as part of the US-led spying network.

On Wednesday, meanwhile, a report in the Washington Post alleged that NSA technicians had tapped into Yahoo and Google data centres around the world, winning access to vast amounts of private data.

The report said a programme dubbed MUSCULAR, operated with the NSA's British counterpart GCHQ, can intercept data directly from the fibre-optic cables used by the US internet giants.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...