Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


US storm continues to cause transport havoc

10 December 2013, 14:43

Minneapolis - Snow and bitter cold snarled traffic and prompted another 1 650 US flight cancellations on Monday, and tens of thousands of people were still without power after January-like weather barged in a month early.

The storm covered parts of North Texas in ice over the weekend and then moved East. Below-zero temperatures crowned the top of the US from Idaho to Minnesota, where many roads still had a 2.5cm thick plate of ice, polished smooth by traffic and impervious to ice-melting chemicals, making intersections an adventure.

Many travellers wished they were home, and people in homes without power wished they were somewhere else.

Some of the most difficult conditions were in North Texas. More than 22 000 Dallas-area homes and businesses were still without power on Monday, according to electric utility Oncor. That was down from 270 000 on Friday. Dallas students got the day off from school.

More than half of the US flight cancellations on Monday were at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, dominated by American Airlines. About 650 travellers were stranded there on Sunday night.

Freezing rain

Nationally, there have been more than 6 100 flight cancellations since Saturday, according to FlightStats.com, including more than 2 800 by American or its American Eagle regional airline. American emerged from bankruptcy protection and merged with US Airways on Monday.

Half of the high school band from Norman, Oklahoma, landed at Dallas-Fort Worth on Monday after playing in a Pearl Harbour Day parade in Hawaii. But the flight for the other half of the band was cancelled because of the ice, leaving them stranded for an extra day in Hawaii.

"Tough break for them, huh?" joked parent chaperone Tami Meyer.

The storm dumped snow through the Mid-Atlantic region. Freezing rain prompted the federal government to allow workers to arrive up to two hours later than normal on Monday or take unscheduled leave.

- AP

Tags us

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...