Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


War on al-Qaeda 'coming to a close'

01 December 2012, 13:39

Washington - The United States must prepare for a time when it no longer is at war with al-Qaeda, and when sweeping federal powers ushered in after the September 11, 2001 attacks come to an end, the Pentagon's top lawyer said.

The address by Pentagon general counsel Jeh Johnson marked the first time a senior US official publicly raised the possibility of an end to the so-called "war on terror," launched by former president George W Bush in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington.

With the US military campaign against al-Qaeda now entering its 12th year, "we must also ask ourselves: how will this conflict end?" Johnson said on Thursday in remarks delivered at the Oxford Union in Britain.

The terror network, which is under steady pressure, eventually will become so weak that it would no longer will make sense to maintain a legal framework for all-out war, Johnson said, according to a text released by the Pentagon.

"I do believe that on the present course, there will come a tipping point - a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al-Qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured, and the group is no longer able to attempt or launch a strategic attack against the United States, such that al-Qaeda as we know it, the organisation that our Congress authorised the military to pursue in 2001, has been effectively destroyed," he said.

It would then fall to law enforcement and intelligence agencies to go after al-Qaeda's remnants, said Johnson, a long-time political ally of President Barack Obama.

"At that point, we must be able to say to ourselves that our efforts should no longer be considered an 'armed conflict' against al-Qaeda and its associated forces," he said.

Instead, the government would pursue "a counter-terrorism effort against individuals who are the scattered remnants of al-Qaeda... with our military assets available in reserve to address continuing and imminent terrorist threats."

The war against al-Qaeda has been cited to justify covert intelligence operations and unilateral military action around the world against suspected militants, including a major drone bombing campaign in Pakistan and the indefinite detention of alleged Qaeda members at a US-run prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The US administration chose to address the issue before an audience in Britain, where the government has harboured misgivings about the legality of the drone bombing raids.

The drone air war dramatically increased since Obama entered the White House in 2009, causing an unknown number of civilian casualties.

US officials, however, reportedly are examining stricter rules that would limit the open-ended, ambiguous nature of the drone raids.

With al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden dead and other senior figures killed however, US officials reportedly are examining stricter rules that would limit the open-ended, ambiguous nature of the drone raids.

Johnson's speech also signalled a possible path to closing the controversial prison at Guantanamo, since the legal rationale for holding detainees would no longer apply once the war was declared over.

"At that point we will also need to face the question of what to do with any members of al-Qaeda who still remain in US military detention without a criminal conviction and sentence," Johnson said, noting that after World War II, the release of some Nazi prisoners of war was delayed.

Johnson, considered a possible candidate to become the next US attorney general, warned that the country must not accept the idea of a permanent state of war with no end in sight.

"'War must be regarded as a finite, extraordinary and unnatural state of affairs," he said.

"War violates the natural order of things in which children bury their parents. In war, parents bury their children," he said.
"In its 12th year, we must not accept the current conflict, and all that it entails, as the 'new normal'," he added.

"Peace must be regarded as the norm toward which the human race continually strives."


Tags al-qaeda usa

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...