Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Women lead fight against radicalisation in Algeria

28 February 2015, 16:18

Algiers - Hundreds of female religious guides have been at the forefront of Algeria's battle against Islamic radicalisation since the civil war that devastated the North African country in the 1990s.

Their aim is to steer women away from false preachers promoting radical forms of Islam.

The surge of the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq, and even in Libya next door, as well as the growing influence of al-Qaeda-linked militants and Salafists, has them working around the clock.

Also Read: Britain rules out lifting arms embargo on Libya

Known as "mourshidates," their goal is to spread the good word of Islam and a message of tolerance, helping those who have strayed from it.

"Killing is a capital sin, so how is it that people can kill innocent ones in the name of Islam," asks Fatma Zohra, who is in her mid-40s, her hair and neck concealed under a matching purple veil and a hijab.

Civil war

Like the other 300 mourshidates appointed by the religious affairs ministry, Zohra holds a degree in Islam and has learned the Qu’ran by heart.

She said she was "motivated to know Islam better in order to teach the religion" following the traditionally moderate Muslim country's civil war in the 1990s, which killed at least 200 000 people.

The war erupted after authorities cancelled the 1991 elections, Algeria's first democratic vote, which the Islamic Action Front was poised to win.

Also Read: Body of Frenchman slain by jihadists flown home from Algeria

Zohra, who was a student at the time, recalled bitterly as she met a group of women in a mosque, that "Algerians killed Algerians in the name of Islam".

For the past 17 years she has been "listening to women, advising them and referring them to specialists" when their problems are not directly linked to religion.

The mourshidates use skills borrowed from psychology and sociology, working in mosques, prisons, youth centres, hospitals and schools. Unlike imams, who are men, they are not allowed to lead prayers.

'Vigilance' needed

When the first mourshida was licensed in 1993 to teach and guide women, only housewives showed up, but the audience has grown over the years to include university students and professionals.

"Imams are good but it is much better to confide in a woman," says Aisha, in her 60s.

Meriem, a high school mathematics teacher, said the rise of "fake prophets," who seek to indoctrinate young people, persuaded her to attend meetings with the likes of Zohra only a few months ago.

"I wanted to learn the true Islam," she said.

Samia, another mourshida who decline to give her surname, says she has been working for the past 15 years in a region of Algeria where youths, both boys and girls, have been increasingly radicalised.

"Their mothers suffer to see them become radicalised and confide in me so that together, and with the help of others, we can de-radicalise them," she said.


Samia warns that Algerians must be alert.

"Even if very few Algerians have joined the ranks of the Islamic State group, vigilance is necessary because radicalisation takes many forms," she said.

"Pseudo-imams, who know nothing about the teachings of the Qu’ran," are trying to indoctrinate people through television programmes and the internet, she said.

"Adolescents in particular must be monitored because they are impressionable and can easily be swayed."

Also Read: Algerian police, protesters clash over Charlie Hebdo

She recalls how she worked hard to help save a 17-year-old girl after her parents complained that she had begun adopting radical Islamist behaviour.

The girl's mother told Samia her daughter "had been indoctrinated and had begun wearing the full Islamic veil" and would admonish the family about attending weddings or watching television.

"For months we counselled the girl and listened to what she had to say. Finally she went back to school and resumed her normal life," Samia said.

Like Samia, many mourshidates say they are proud to have contributed to help youths from falling into the grips of radical Islamists.

"It is the biggest reward of our work," one of them said.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...