Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Blood and terror on the streets as protests grip Ethiopia

22 December 2015, 21:32

Wolenkomi - Two lifeless bodies lay on the ground as the terrified crowd, armed only with sticks against gun-toting Ethiopian security forces, fled the fierce crackdown on protesters.

Blood seeped through a sheet covering one of the bodies on the road outside Wolenkomi, a town just 60 kilometres (37 miles) from the capital Addis Ababa.

"That was my only son," a woman sobbed. "They have killed me."

Back at the family home of 20-year-old Kumsa Tafa, his younger sister Ababetch shook as she spoke. "He was a student. No one was violent. I do not understand why he is dead," she said.

Human Rights Watch says at least 75 people have been killed in a bloody crackdown on protests by the Oromo people, Ethiopia's largest ethnic group.

Bekele Gerba, deputy president of the Oromo Federal Congress, puts the toll at more than 80 while the government says only five have been killed.

The demonstrations have spread to several towns since November, when students spoke out against plans to expand the capital into Oromia territory -- a move the Oromo consider a land grab.

Also Read: US announces $88m in food aid to Ethiopia

The sight of the protesters on the streets of towns like Wolenkomi -- shouting "Stop the killings! This isn't democracy!" -- is rare in a country with little tolerance for expressions of discontent with the government.

Tree trunks and stones are strewn on the asphalt on the road west from Addis to Shewa zone, in Oromia territory, barricading the route for several kilometres.

Chaos broke out on a bus on the road when it emerged that the police were again clashing with demonstrators in Wolenkomi.

"My husband just called me," said a woman clutching her phone, as others screamed and children burst into tears.

"He's taking refuge in a church. Police shot at the protesters," she said.

The man next to her cried in despair: "They're taking our land, killing our children. Why don't they just kill everyone now?"

The army raided Wolenkomi again the next day, the rattle of gunfire lasting for more than an hour.

"They grabbed me by the face and they told me, 'Go home! If you come back here, we'll kill you'," said Kafani, a shopkeeper.

Rights groups have repeatedly criticised Ethiopia's use of anti-terrorism legislation to stifle peaceful dissent, with the US expressing concern over the recent crackdown and urging the government to employ restraint.

But Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn declared on television that the government would act "without mercy in the fight against forces which are trying to destabilise the region."

'Land is everything'

Oromo leaders have vowed to keep up their resistance against proposals to extend Addis, and Human Rights Watch has warned of "a rapidly rising risk of greater bloodshed".

"The government can continue to send security forces and act with violence -- we will never give up," said Gerba.

Land is at the heart of the problem. Under Ethiopia's constitution, all land belongs to the state, with owners legally considered tenants -- raising fears amongst the Oromo that a wave of dispossession is on its way.

"For farmers in Oromia and elsewhere in the country, their land is everything," said Felix Horne, a researcher at Human Rights Watch.

"It's critical for their food supply, for their identity, for their culture," he said.

"You cannot displace someone from their land with no consultation and then inadequately compensate them and not expect there to be any response," Horne warned.

Some Oromo have already seen their lands confiscated.

Also Read:Africa blasts ICC as world crimes court members meet

Further west, in the town of Ambo, a woman named Turu was expropriated of her two hectares, receiving only 40,000 birr ($1,900, 1,700 euros) in compensation.

"We had a good life before," she said.

Today she struggles to support her four children and her disabled husband with the 30 birr a day ($1.40, 1.30 euros) she earns working in a factory.

With their own language distinct from Ethiopia's official Amharic tongue, the 27 million Oromo make up nearly 30 percent of the country's population.

"The Oromos are seen as more of a threat by the government in part because they are by far the largest ethnic group," said Horne.

The proposed expansion of Addis is part of a 25-year development plan to boost the city's infrastructure and attract new investors.

It sparked demonstrations last year, but on a smaller scale.



Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...