Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.

 

Trump says he'll accept a clear election result, won't lose

21 October 2016, 10:21

Washington — Donald Trump has stepped back only slightly from his refusal to say during his debate with Hillary Clinton whether he would concede if he loses on Election Day, failing to stem the criticism that flowed from Republicans and Democrats over an attitude some contended struck at the heart of American democracy.

"I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters and to all of the people of the United States that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election," Trump said Thursday while campaigning in Ohio. After letting that vow hang in the air for a few seconds, he added, "if I win."

Putting aside his mocking tone, Trump said he would accept "a clear election result" but reserved his right to "contest or file a legal challenge" if he lost on November 8. He brushed off the likelihood of that happening with a confident prediction that "we're not going to lose."

Among those criticizing Trump was Sen. John McCain, the Arizona Republican who lost to Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential race.

"I didn't like the outcome of the 2008 election. But I had a duty to concede, and I did so without reluctance," McCain said in a statement. "A concession isn't just an exercise in graciousness. It is an act of respect for the will of the American people, a respect that is every American leader's first responsibility."

While Trump maintained he would win, numerous Republican leaders conceded that he was heading for defeat barring a significant shift in the campaign's closing days. The GOP's top concern was turning to salvaging its majority in the Senate, followed closely by worries over the Republicans' once comfortable grip on the House.

The annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner, a Catholic fundraiser in New York, was by tradition a moment when the Republican and Democratic nominees could turn any campaign vitriol into barbed humor and ultimately a show of national unity. The Thursday night event offered many hearty laughs — and a few awkward ones.

"We have proven we can actually be civil with each other," Trump said about the opponent he has asserted belongs in jail for alleged criminal acts. "In fact, just before taking the dais Hillary accidentally bumped into me and she very civilly said, 'Pardon me.'"

Following Trump at the dinner, Clinton cracked: "I didn't think he'd be OK with a peaceful transition of power."

But Trump drew some boos and jeers in the Waldorf-Astoria ballroom when he referred to Clinton being "so corrupt" and said without apparent humor that she was appearing at the event "pretending not to hate Catholics" — a line delivered during a benefit for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York.

Clinton's jokes were cutting but delivered in the more accepted fashion of a roast. While several women have accused Trump of being sexually aggressive, Clinton steered clear of that controversy but referenced his public comments about the appearance of women with whom he has feuded: "Donald looks at the Statue of Liberty and sees a 4 — maybe a 5 if she loses the torch and tablet and changes her hair."

During an Ohio rally earlier Thursday, Trump tried to turn the attention to Clinton by accusing her of "cheating" and suggesting she should "resign from the race." He cited a hacked email disclosed publicly by WikiLeaks that showed her campaign was tipped off about a question she'd be asked in a CNN town hall meeting during the Democratic primary.

"Can you imagine if I got the questions? They would call for the re-establishment of the electric chair, do you agree?" Trump said.

- AP

NEXT ON NEWS24 NIGERIAX
&nbps;

Read more from our Users

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Separating kitchen politics from ...

Like everyone else, I believe that the most popular definition of democracy is “government of the people, by the people and for the people”. Read more...

Submitted by
Bethel Tanifo
Ministry of Niger Delta Affairs, ...

Like NDDC Unlike MONDA. This notion is an intuition that does not portend political participation, affiliation, intrusion or aggression but a submission with the intention of completion of the previous administration's noble vision. Read more...

Submitted by
Bethel Tanifo
Nigerian Constitution versus Corr...

The problems of Nigeria is not in its conventional composition, formation, functionality, constitution or treaty, while the solutions are not disintegrations as promulgated by some faiths fanatics and bigotries.  Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Much Ado about Trump’s Presidency

It was unbelievable when the social and mainstream media all over the world began airing the breaking news of Donald Trump’s victory in the most contentious US Presidential elections in recent years. Read more...

Submitted by
Mike Daemon
Nigerian author highlights gay ch...

A new novel by a prolific young Nigerian author features gay characters, which could help increase the visibility of the gay community and possibly lead to greater understanding of LGBT Nigerians. Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Your Excellency, I will call you ...

Your Excellency, Governor Adams Oshiomhole, as a leader that pays attention to details, I understand that the odd title of this piece would definitely arouse your curiosity.  Read more...