Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


UN panel: Too often only half of aid money get to the needy

04 February 2016, 06:33

United Nations — Too often only half of the money from donors is getting to the millions of people devastated by conflicts and natural disasters who desperately need humanitarian aid, the co-chair of a U.N.-appointed panel said Wednesday.

Kristalina Georgieva, the European Commission's vice president for budget and human resources, said the nine-member panel trying to find new financing to help the rapidly growing number of people needing humanitarian aid is urging donors and aid organizations to work more closely to drive down costs.

"Humanitarian money is like gold" because it saves lives, she told a briefing on the panel's report. "But our goals very often are very low karat — a 9 karat gold — because we take a dollar or a pound or a yen or a ruble, and by the time it gets to the recipient it shrinks to only half of what it is worth."

Georgieva said this is because of transaction costs, administration and "because of us creating bureaucracy."

The report said the world is spending around $25 billion to help 125 million people today — more than 12 times the $2 billion spent in 2000 — but there is still a $15 billion annual funding gap. It warned that if the current trend continues, the cost of humanitarian assistance will rise to $50 billion by 2030.

Also read: UN aid appeal for war-torn Libya only 1 per cent funded

The report focuses on three solutions: mobilizing more funds, shrinking the need for aid by preventing and resolving conflicts, and improving the efficiency of assistance.

"There are plenty of examples where 90, even 95 cents on the dollar get into the hands of people in need," Georgieva told several journalists after the briefing, and these should be emulated as best practices.

Georgieva also asked "how come today only 0.2 percent of funding we provide goes direct to local organizations when we know that ... they are the first line of defense when something tragic happens?"

The panel called for an end to competition between aid organizations and between humanitarian and development agencies, which Georgieva called "competitive inefficiency."

"We want to see it moving to be collaborative efficiency," she said.

- AP

Tags un

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...