Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


UN set to adopt resolution to disrupt Islamic State funds

17 December 2015, 10:44

United Nations — Finance ministers from the 15 nations on the U.N. Security Council will meet Thursday to adopt a resolution aimed at disrupting the outside revenue that the Islamic State extremist group gets from selling oil and antiquities, from ransom payments and other criminal activities.

The Islamic State group is already subject to U.N. sanctions under resolutions dealing with al-Qaida. But the proposed resolution, sponsored by the United States and Russia, elevates IS to the same level as al-Qaida, reflecting its split from al-Qaida and the growing threat it poses especially in the Mideast and North Africa.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, who will chair Thursday's meeting, said when the meeting was announced earlier this month that disrupting the Islamic State group's financing and cutting it off from the international financial system "are critical to effectively combating this violent terrorist group."

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power told reporters Wednesday that the meeting is an unprecedented chance to bring together the people with the technical abilities to track and cut off funds to "starve" the Islamic State group of resources.

The Islamic State group, also known as ISIL and Daesh, controls a large swath of Syria and Iraq, including oil and gas fields, though bombing campaigns by the U.S.-led coalition and ground forces have enabled Iraq to regain some territory.

While the resolution is aimed at cutting off some of IS' outside revenue streams, a U.N. diplomat and U.S. official said the majority of funding for the extremist group comes from internal sources which are difficult to disrupt. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

The U.S. official said getting at IS' revenue is a serious challenge because much of it is internally generated from oil and gas sales which have the potential to generate hundreds of millions of dollars annually as well as from taxation and extortion. This is in contrast to al-Qaida, whose funding typically comes from outside donors, including charities and kidnapping for ransom.

Also Read:Le Pen under fire for tweeting grisly ISIS images

The draft resolution, obtained by The Associated Press, would rename the U.N. Security Council committee monitoring sanctions against al-Qaida "the ISIL (Daesh) and al-Qaida sanctions committee."

It calls ISIL a splinter group of al-Qaida and stresses that "any individual, group, undertaking, or entity supporting ISIL or al-Qaida" is subject to U.N. sanctions, including an asset freeze, travel ban and arms embargo.

Power, the U.S. ambassador, said the resolution will be a new piece of international law that "will require countries to do more than they have been doing."

The fact the Islamic State group is still able to traffic in oil and artifacts and extort people is "a problem we should be able to solve," she said.

The draft encourages the 193 U.N. member states "to more actively submit" names for inclusion on the sanctions list and expresses "increasing concern" at the failure of countries to implement previous sanctions resolutions.

It calls on all countries "to move vigorously and decisively to cut the flows of funds and other financial assets and economic resources" to those on the sanctions list.

The proposed resolution urges countries to share information about extremist groups and calls for a report within 120 days on what every country is doing to tackle the financing of IS and al-Qaida.

It also requests Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to provide an initial "strategic-level report" in 45 days on the sources of financing of IS and associated groups, including through illicit trade in oil, antiquities and other natural resources, as well as their planning and facilitation of attacks, and to provide updates every four months.

- AP

Tags un isis

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...